ASLMU prez graphic

Ken Cavanaugh and Emily Sinsky

1. Why did you decide to run?

We haven’t been planning to do this for a long time. We're both people who are really passionate about social justice and making this school a good place. We decided to run together before we decided who would run for president and vice president, because we see it as a fluid exchange. We’ve definitely been partners throughout this process, and we’ve been friends since the first day of freshman year.

2. What are some of the most important changes you plan to implement if elected?

The rationale for making our platform was to find really specific changes we want to make at LMU. Some of those include period products in all resident halls and public spaces on campus, price ceilings on textbooks and helping students pay for that, because that can be a surprising cost. We also want to start a campus farmers market that accepts Lion dollars so students have access to fresh produce and healthy eating options. In general, it's making advocacy more accessible for students. Two students should not represent the entire student body. We want to focus on what students want and what they will be willing to organize around and advocate for. It's also about how we can appeal to the board of trustees to make those things happen.

3. What do you want the LMU community to take away from your platform?

We want to make real, tangible changes that tend to students’ needs. The funding of the University is not in control of the students. The most important thing about our platform is that it's built on the idea that students need to be able to mobilize around what they want to see at the school. Students should be able to do what they can to advocate for their own needs and appeal to the University administration, to ASLMU and to the board of trustees so that we can get resources for ourselves that will make our school lives easier and make LMU a place where everyone can flourish with what they need to succeed.

4. Why do you think student government is important?

I think it's a testament to going out and being the change you want to see. ASLMU is the structure we have as students to communicate with the University to tell them what we care about and what we need. We want to make it easier for students to bring their concerns to the administration.

Jonathan Ting and Tess Siri

1. Why did you decide to run?

We decided to run after reflecting on our combined leadership and membership roles at LMU, and believe that we hold a wide range of experience in terms of the organizations that we have joined. We think that we are approachable people who want to be fellow classmates and peers in leadership positions next year. Rather than claim that we are the best leaders on campus, we acknowledge that we have learned from equally qualified leaders during our entire collegiate experience.

2. What are some of the most important changes you plan to implement if elected?

We want our student body to feel supported by us through engagements that increase their networking experience with students of other organizations, as well as alumni. We also want to see our RSOs connect with each other by attending each other’s events with an incentivized point system through ASLMU. Developing the point system would take effort from our cabinet, our senators and Ting and me; however, we are willing to put in the effort if it means unifying our Lion community.

3. What do you want the LMU community to take away from your platform?

The three main ideas that our platform is based on can be broken down into engagement, community and creating passion with purpose. With engagement, we want students to be aware of the opportunities that LMU offers. We have over 190 registered student organizations on campus, and we really want students to realize that there will be a community for them at LMU. Community comes from the idea that although the University is broken down into organizations, we still want each organization and club to support one another. Every organization spends countless hours setting up events, and we want to see a future where these events are attended by everyone rather than just members who belong to that specific organization. We believe that this sense of community and encouragement will only unite our university and make living on the bluff a truly rewarding experience. The final point that our platform is focused on is “passion with purpose." We believe that anything a Lion does at LMU should be filled with passion, but also with purpose. Everything we do from academics to extracurriculars should help benefit us by making us better people for others. We really want students to care about the things that they do as a Lion. The amount of pride that Tess and I have for our university is endless, and we know that we can help create this similar feeling for our current and future Lions next year.

4. Why do you think student government is important?

Student government is important because it allows students to represent the wants and needs of fellow students on campus. College life is hard enough, with paying for tuition, housing and food, making and losing relationships with peers, participating in organizations, preparing for careers and/or graduate school and much more contributing to the stresses of college students. We, as college students, empathize with what a large portion of our students go through because we have simultaneously experienced these issues. It is important to have student government represent the needs and wants of the student body, because we also go through these hardships and personally understand the necessity of a better college climate.

Sam Cassidy and Camila De Pierola

1. Why did you decide to run?

After Public Safety failed to notify students of an active shooter threat last semester, we as a campus brought our voices together to make action that was able to create the change that LMU needed. That's what we want to capture again. We decided to run because we are deeply passionate about creating tangible, meaningful change that touches on the most pressing issues our university faces. Students want a voice that brings passion to action, and we believe as ASLMU President and Vice President we would be able to evoke action that would truly better LMU.

2. What are some of the most important changes you plan to implement if elected?

With the entirety of our platform outlining the next academic year, the most important changes we want to highlight are those that cultivate community, create real change, and make the most impact on the lives of students. The creation of a Leadership Council for Ethnic and Intercultural Student organizations will not only unite the diverse cultural communities and their leaders on campus, but also transform how we talk about issues pertaining to race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, neurodiversity, socioeconomic status, and other intersecting identities in a way we've never seen before. The implementation of our Lion Dollar Donor Initiative will allow students to donate excess Lion Dollars to a collective pot where students who are food insecure can get gift cards for when they need the extra funds to eat. With over a thousand of our students suffering from food insecurity, this initiative would help the students who need it the most. Finally, our most urgent and needed change is our Student Safety Plan, which will educate faculty, RAs, and student leaders on how to handle an active shooter threat, sexual assault, mental health struggles, and other emergencies students face through training on trauma-informed therapy, nonviolent communication, and crisis prevention strategies.

3. What do you want the LMU community to take away from your platform?

What we want people to take away from our platform is that we aren't just here to talk about our ideas; we're already implementing them and have shown we will put our words to action. As the only candidates who have worked within ASLMU and shaped campus-wide, statewide, and nationwide policy, we are prepared to tackle the problems students at LMU face in a way that you will be able to see. Anyone can have good ideas. What we want the LMU community to see is that we're here to ignite a real impact.

4. Why do you think student government is important?

Student Government is crucial to college campuses and life because it allows the thousands of students attending to have a collective voice that they know is capable of bringing about real change. Leadership can bring about the change students need in their lives through their skills, knowledge, and understanding of whom those they represent truly desire. Students who represent students do so not as just business partners, but as friends, family, and community members. We aren't here to talk for you, but with you.

Sofia is a junior English major from Portland, OR. She enjoys watching New Girl and listening to alternative and hip hop music. Sofia loves and respects the masterpiece that is Chief Keef's "Love Sosa."

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