There is no road map to living a happy, fulfilling life as a queer person.

Many people who are a part of the LGBTQ+ community must forge their own path, with or without the support of their families and loved ones. The stories of many queer people have yet to be heard at LMU, which inspired me to create this interview series, Queer Lions. The stories of the people interviewed cover topics such as coming to terms with religion while not compromising one’s sexuality to coming out in general. Their stories can serve as references for queer people as well as straight allies who want to know how other queer people have dealt with these issues. I hope their stories will help build a bridge between the younger and older generations in the LGBTQ+ community at LMU and, in turn, forge a stronger and more present queer community on campus.


This feature was created by senior Opinion writer Alex Myers in January of 2019 and is accompanied by his commentary.




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Arturo Jacobo is no stranger to battling injustices within a heteronormative and racist society. His viewpoint on racism within the gay community and the homophobia that is present in mainstream culture forced him to stand up for everyone in the communities that he represents. I sat down wit…

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Larry Daves strives to use his intersecting identities to educate others on racism and homophobia. As the Program Coordinator of Sorority & Fraternity life at LMU, he takes pride in helping his students learn more about issues outside their inner circles while showing to the world that G…






Racism

As a white male, it is not my place to speak about racism within the LGBTQ+ community. It is essential to let queer people of color speak for themselves about their experiences with racism within the gay community. Racism has been so prevalent in the gay dating scene that the gay dating app Grindr started a campaign called Kindr which advocates for people to be less racist on the dating app. Many acts of racism that are covered as “preference” are prevalent in the community and can have a deep effect on queer people of colors' mental health. The stories concerning racism in Queer Lions share a common focus that intersectionality is not brought up enough in the gay community and that there needs to be more advocacy for an all-inclusive gay community.






Family

Many LGBTQ+ people have struggled finding acceptance within their families and the effects on their health and well-being are immense. According to a study done by the Family Acceptance Project, LGBT youth were “more than eight times as likely to have attempted suicide, nearly six times as likely to report high levels of depression and more than three times as likely to use illegal drugs” if they were not accepted by their families. These challenges growing up in an anti-LGBT household as a queer youth have been shown to be extremely detrimental to many queer people; however, the stories in Queer Lions exemplify how queer people have risen above their circumstances.






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Lauren Moreno serves as the director of LGBT Student Services at LMU. They have been brave in coming out in the face of opposition, especially when it came to reconciling their faith with their sexuality. Moreno recently came out with their gender-neutral pronouns and stands with their stude…

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Anthony Bodlovic is an art therapist and director of Marital and Family Therapy at LMU. The art therapist uses his work to express his queerness and he has also helped empathize with his patients that are dealing with queer issues such as coming out. Being raised by Croatian immigrants, Bodl…

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Celine Alvarado is an empowered lesbian who has a deep understanding of her own queerness. The senior communication studies major who is the president of LMU’s Gender-Sexuality Alliance took time to tell me how she understands herself in relation to a heteronormative world. 

Religion

People who are apart of the gay community have been wrongly told that their faith and sexuality could not coincide. Religion has been taught by many to be exclusive to only those who were fortunate enough to identify as heterosexual. With all these misconceptions embedded in traditional religions, queer people of faith have learned to pave their own way and find a refined and unique understanding of what it means to be loved by a higher power.


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Anya Michele owns her queerness in a unique way. Growing up Catholic in New Orleans, the freshman psychology and women's and gender studies double major desires to make sense of her intersecting identities to help other young queer women who share the same experiences as her.

Other Articles Discussing Queer Issues

There are many more queer lions that could be included in this feature, and many other issues on campus that relate to LMU's LGBTQ+ community. Though coverage will never be complete, the hope is that by grouping these articles together, we can bring awareness to the lives and experiences of LMU's LGBTQ+ community.



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This semester I took on a project that would focus on queer people’s experience at LMU through interviews. In these interviews, I found nothing but lessons and wisdom that queer people can use today to better their own lives and to help them know that they are not alone in their queer experi…

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When I first heard the word LGBT as a child, I never once thought that there were more variants to the queer community than what was placed in that acronym. The binary was clear to me. I thought gay men marry men, lesbians marry women, bisexual people have the choice of both and trans men an…

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Toned abs, mountainous biceps and a tabletop ass; what do these qualities all have in common, you might ask? Well, they are the triforce of the picture-perfect gay male.