The Bluff is a humorous and satirical section published in the Loyolan. All quotes attributed to real figures are completely fabricated; persons otherwise mentioned are completely fictional.

Halloween. The kick-off to the holiday season. But, like many seemingly good things, there is a dark underbelly to the occasion — cultural appropriation.

Cultural appropriation has been a hot topic in the last decade or so. Suddenly, it seems what used to be pure, harmless fun is now seen as an attack. And maybe political correctness needs to span beyond the scope of just historically oppressed groups.

Obviously, dressing like a person who has been the victim of unfounded prejudice for generations is wrong. But what about non-historically marginalized groups—groups that haven’t had it too bad, but still don’t like to be mocked?

Junior Mark Whitman is leading the fight against the appropriation of what he refers to as the Historically Privileged. “Why is it that someone can get in trouble for wearing a headdress, but anyone is allowed to wear Vineyard Vines? My culture ... is not a costume,” said Whitman.

Iza Christopher experienced Whitman’s passion firsthand. “I once dressed as a neo-liberal podcaster. Mark asked me to leave the party. Then he tweeted a picture of me with the caption ‘judas’ and told me I was canceled.”

“I went as a ghost. He told me to check my privilege” said a friend of Christopher.

He has accused several groups of sophomore girls dressed as frat boys of committing “hate crimes” and was spotted telling a young girl dressed as an astronaut that she should “be mindful about the history of [her] costume.”

Whitman knows his opinions are controversial, but says that he is not alone in his fight. “We are the silent majority. The recently oppressed. Sure, our ancestors may have been colonizers or just really passive about the terrible things that were not happening to them, but that doesn’t mean we deserve this kind of treatment.”

Whitman does believe there is still space for fun and creativity. “You can still dress up. There are costumes that aren’t offensive. A tree, for example. Or the wind.” He is staying true to his morals and says he does not intend to stop any time soon. “I’m fighting so my kids can grow up in a world where they don’t have to feel ashamed to be privileged. That’s the American dream.”

The Bluff is a humorous and satirical section published in the Loyolan. All quotes attributed to real figures are completely fabricated; persons otherwise mentioned are completely fictional.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.